Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter have made our world smaller. With these websites, it can be very easy to reconnect with your long-lost friend, an old colleague or even your first sweetheart.

If you are going through a divorce, social media is a platform that you need to navigate with caution. A post on Facebook or a tweet can be used against you in court, and could have a negative effect on the outcome of your case.

For example, your demand for spousal support may be questioned after you post a photo of an expensive purchase on your Instagram account. Your spouse may use that purchase against you to ask why you need alimony if you have the money to purchase lavish products.

Besides the potential to impact your case, social media can also affect you emotionally. Photos of happy friends and relative can lead to you experiencing negative feelings about yourself when you compare your situation to theirs.

Going through a divorce does not necessarily mean that you simply avoid Facebook or Twitter. However, you should just pay attention to these tips to avoid adversely impacting your case:

  1. Think before you click. Before posting anything, think twice. Assume that the other party can interpret any post you make in the worst way.
  2. Go over your friends and followers list. Take a look at your social media followers and determine who among them would likely share your latest post or tweet with your spouse. Remember, anyone who has information about anything you shared online can testify in your divorce or custody proceedings.
  3. Check your privacy settings. Make sure that you are able to limit access to the information you post on your social network.
  4. Avoid stalking your ex on Facebook or Twitter. It won’t help you at all and could potentially make matters worse for you.
  5. Finally, never share any legal advice you received with others. Avoid using the phrase “my attorney said” on Facebook or Twitter. This could potentially waive your attorney-client privilege and adversely affect your divorce proceeding.